Discussion:
(OT) The Life and Death of a Woman-Hater
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Pelle Svanslös
2021-02-21 17:54:30 UTC
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When the conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died on Wednesday of
complications from cancer, he ended a decades-long career as one of the
most malignant and sadistic figures on the right.

His contributions to contemporary conservatism encouraged members of the
Republican Party base to be meaner, smaller and more vulgar. He anchored
his banter with a steady stream of invective, by turns promoting
xenophobia, racism, homophobia and misogyny, teeing up a ready-made
audience for the cruelty politics of Donald Trump.

Mr. Limbaugh burst on the national scene in the late 1980s during a
national anti-feminist backlash and as the Republican Party was
completing its turn away from libertarianism and toward the religious
right. While he often gave rhetorical nods to the “pro-family”
traditional values of the Moral Majority, he didn’t adopt its veneer of
propriety — he was positively lascivious in his rhetoric, using ugliness
and shock to promote embittered and unvarnished sexism, and he saw a
world of opportunity in the party. Republicans, in turn, saw opportunity
in him.

He really hit his stride when Bill Clinton ran for office. Mr. Clinton
was accompanied by a feminist wife whose biography — a successful
lawyer, an advocate for women’s and children’s rights, a woman who kept
her own name and identity after marriage — often set off unhinged
emotional outbursts from many Republicans, including Mr. Limbaugh.

Attacking Hillary Clinton in some of the ugliest terms possible became
Mr. Limbaugh’s bread and butter, a guaranteed crowd-pleaser that
sustained his show through three decades. He helped build a cottage
industry of Hillary-hate.

In 1992, Mr. Limbaugh introduced the term “feminazi,” a pejorative he
assigned women who spoke out for their own rights generally, and for
abortion rights specifically. It was his preferred term, he said, for
“women who are obsessed with perpetuating a modern-day Holocaust: abortion.”

Girls were not spared his ire. Mr. Limbaugh told viewers of his
television show in 1993: “Socks is the White House cat. But did you know
there is also a White House dog?” And he held up a photograph of Chelsea
Clinton, who at the time was just 13 years old. Two decades later, as he
established a steady patter of racist and misogynistic hate aimed at
Barack and Michelle Obama, Mr. Limbaugh took to calling Mrs. Obama
“Moochelle,” reinforcing the idea that women are only as valuable as
their looks — a rule that he did not seem to apply to men.

That Mr. Limbaugh’s fortunes grew with this kind of extreme and schlocky
rhetoric, could not have been lost on conservative politicians. The
victories of the civil rights and feminist movements in the 1960s and
’70s had forced a great reorganization in American politics, with the
Republican Party seizing opportunities for growth among whites angry
about progress toward racial equality, and among men who resented
women’s changing roles and growing power in the workplace, society and
the family.

Mr. Limbaugh was the ur-character of this new kind of conservative
Republican: one who spoke out loudly for traditional values — which in
this case meant male authority over women — as well as the cultural,
political and economic dominance of whites. But unlike many Republican
politicians, he eschewed dog whistles and code words in favor of
unvarnished bigotry.

Aware of his reach, Republican politicians began competing for his
listeners’ votes. That meant firmly solidifying themselves as opponents
of women’s rights, privacy and progress.

As much as moderate Republicans may have publicly, at least
occasionally, wrung their hands over Mr. Limbaugh’s boorishness, they
were happy to support his politics.

Mr. Limbaugh was so blatantly racist and sexist that he made the race-
and gender-based hostilities of mainstream conservatism look more
reasonable by comparison. He made hostile misogyny so normal on the
reactionary right that Donald Trump, who shocked uninitiated liberals,
sounded downright familiar to anyone tuned into right-wing radio.

No wonder the attempts in 2016 to kneecap Mr. Trump’s candidacy by
pointing to his disparaging comments about women and his boasting about
sexual assault were largely impotent. In Rush country, that’s daily
entertainment.

Mr. Limbaugh didn’t create right-wing misogyny or hate speech. But he
did more than his part to reinforce and expand it. In 2017, a man in Mr.
Limbaugh’s viciously misogynist mold was installed in the presidency
even after calling women pigs and dogs, and even after he was caught on
tape boasting about grabbing women’s genitals.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/20/opinion/rush-limbaugh-women.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces&block=more_in_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=683809517&impression_id=526297f0-73da-11eb-ae9f-596287947b25&index=0&pgtype=Article&region=footer&req_id=835931304&surface=more-in-opinion&variant=1_bandit-all-surfaces

Amen.
--
Every boy and every gal
That’s born into this world alive
Is either a little Liberal
Or a little Conservative

-- W. S. Gilbert
*skriptis
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Permalink
When the conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died on Wednesday of complications from cancer, he ended a decades-long career as one of the most malignant and sadistic figures on the right.His contributions to contemporary conservatism encouraged members of the Republican Party base to be meaner, smaller and more vulgar. He anchored his banter with a steady stream of invective, by turns promoting xenophobia, racism, homophobia and misogyny, teeing up a ready-made audience for the cruelty politics of Donald Trump.Mr. Limbaugh burst on the national scene in the late 1980s during a national anti-feminist backlash and as the Republican Party was completing its turn away from libertarianism and toward the religious right. While he often gave rhetorical nods to the “pro-family” traditional values of the Moral Majority, he didn’t adopt its veneer of propriety — he was positively lascivious in his rhetoric, using ugliness and shock to promote embittered and unvarnished sexism, and he saw a world of opportunity in the party. Republicans, in turn, saw opportunity in him.He really hit his stride when Bill Clinton ran for office. Mr. Clinton was accompanied by a feminist wife whose biography — a successful lawyer, an advocate for women’s and children’s rights, a woman who kept her own name and identity after marriage — often set off unhinged emotional outbursts from many Republicans, including Mr. Limbaugh.Attacking Hillary Clinton in some of the ugliest terms possible became Mr. Limbaugh’s bread and butter, a guaranteed crowd-pleaser that sustained his show through three decades. He helped build a cottage industry of Hillary-hate.In 1992, Mr. Limbaugh introduced the term “feminazi,” a pejorative he assigned women who spoke out for their own rights generally, and for abortion rights specifically. It was his preferred term, he said, for “women who are obsessed with perpetuating a modern-day Holocaust: abortion.”Girls were not spared his ire. Mr. Limbaugh told viewers of his television show in 1993: “Socks is the White House cat. But did you know there is also a White House dog?” And he held up a photograph of Chelsea Clinton, who at the time was just 13 years old. Two decades later, as he established a steady patter of racist and misogynistic hate aimed at Barack and Michelle Obama, Mr. Limbaugh took to calling Mrs. Obama “Moochelle,” reinforcing the idea that women are only as valuable as their looks — a rule that he did not seem to apply to men.That Mr. Limbaugh’s fortunes grew with this kind of extreme and schlocky rhetoric, could not have been lost on conservative politicians. The victories of the civil rights and feminist movements in the 1960s and ’70s had forced a great reorganization in American politics, with the Republican Party seizing opportunities for growth among whites angry about progress toward racial equality, and among men who resented women’s changing roles and growing power in the workplace, society and the family.Mr. Limbaugh was the ur-character of this new kind of conservative Republican: one who spoke out loudly for traditional values — which in this case meant male authority over women — as well as the cultural, political and economic dominance of whites. But unlike many Republican politicians, he eschewed dog whistles and code words in favor of unvarnished bigotry.Aware of his reach, Republican politicians began competing for his listeners’ votes. That meant firmly solidifying themselves as opponents of women’s rights, privacy and progress.As much as moderate Republicans may have publicly, at least occasionally, wrung their hands over Mr. Limbaugh’s boorishness, they were happy to support his politics.Mr. Limbaugh was so blatantly racist and sexist that he made the race- and gender-based hostilities of mainstream conservatism look more reasonable by comparison. He made hostile misogyny so normal on the reactionary right that Donald Trump, who shocked uninitiated liberals, sounded downright familiar to anyone tuned into right-wing radio.No wonder the attempts in 2016 to kneecap Mr. Trump’s candidacy by pointing to his disparaging comments about women and his boasting about sexual assault were largely impotent. In Rush country, that’s daily entertainment.Mr. Limbaugh didn’t create right-wing misogyny or hate speech. But he did more than his part to reinforce and expand it. In 2017, a man in Mr. Limbaugh’s viciously misogynist mold was installed in the presidency even after calling women pigs and dogs, and even after he was caught on tape boasting about grabbing women’s genitals.https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/20/opinion/rush-limbaugh-women.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces&block=more_in_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=683809517&impression_id=526297f0-73da-11eb-ae9f-596287947b25&index=0&pgtype=Article&region=footer&req_id=835931304&surface=more-in-opinion&variant=1_bandit-all-surfacesAmen.-- Every boy and every galThat’s born into this world aliveIs either a little LiberalOr a little Conservative-- W. S. Gilbert
The author is biased.

It's a woman. Dominatrix. And a Serb.



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jill_Filipovic

"Filipovic is of Serbian descent through her father's side of the family. She married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018."

"Filipovic's opposition to name change for women who marry, published in The Guardian in 2013 as "Why should married women change their names? Let men change theirs", was cited as recommended reading on the social construction of gender in Critical Encounters in Secondary English: Teaching Literacy Theory to Adolescents by Deborah Appleman (2014). Filipovic married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018, and kept her last name upon marriage."



Imagine a female Djokovic. That's what you're dealing with here.
--
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
https://piaohong.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/usenet/index.html
Pelle Svanslös
2021-02-22 10:55:37 UTC
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Permalink
Post by *skriptis
When the conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died on Wednesday of complications from cancer, he ended a decades-long career as one of the most malignant and sadistic figures on the right.His contributions to contemporary conservatism encouraged members of the Republican Party base to be meaner, smaller and more vulgar. He anchored his banter with a steady stream of invective, by turns promoting xenophobia, racism, homophobia and misogyny, teeing up a ready-made audience for the cruelty politics of Donald Trump.Mr. Limbaugh burst on the national scene in the late 1980s during a national anti-feminist backlash and as the Republican Party was completing its turn away from libertarianism and toward the religious right. While he often gave rhetorical nods to the “pro-family” traditional values of the Moral Majority, he didn’t adopt its veneer of propriety — he was positively lascivious in his rhetoric, using ugliness and shock to promote embittered and unvarnished sexism, and he saw a world of opportunity in the party. Republicans, in turn, saw opportunity in him.He really hit his stride when Bill Clinton ran for office. Mr. Clinton was accompanied by a feminist wife whose biography — a successful lawyer, an advocate for women’s and children’s rights, a woman who kept her own name and identity after marriage — often set off unhinged emotional outbursts from many Republicans, including Mr. Limbaugh.Attacking Hillary Clinton in some of the ugliest terms possible became Mr. Limbaugh’s bread and butter, a guaranteed crowd-pleaser that sustained his show through three decades. He helped build a cottage industry of Hillary-hate.In 1992, Mr. Limbaugh introduced the term “feminazi,” a pejorative he assigned women who spoke out for their own rights generally, and for abortion rights specifically. It was his preferred term, he said, for “women who are obsessed with perpetuating a modern-day Holocaust: abortion.”Girls were not spared his ire. Mr. Limbaugh told viewers of his television show in 1993: “Socks is the White House cat. But did you know there is also a White House dog?” And he held up a photograph of Chelsea Clinton, who at the time was just 13 years old. Two decades later, as he established a steady patter of racist and misogynistic hate aimed at Barack and Michelle Obama, Mr. Limbaugh took to calling Mrs. Obama “Moochelle,” reinforcing the idea that women are only as valuable as their looks — a rule that he did not seem to apply to men.That Mr. Limbaugh’s fortunes grew with this kind of extreme and schlocky rhetoric, could not have been lost on conservative politicians. The victories of the civil rights and feminist movements in the 1960s and ’70s had forced a great reorganization in American politics, with the Republican Party seizing opportunities for growth among whites angry about progress toward racial equality, and among men who resented women’s changing roles and growing power in the workplace, society and the family.Mr. Limbaugh was the ur-character of this new kind of conservative Republican: one who spoke out loudly for traditional values — which in this case meant male authority over women — as well as the cultural, political and economic dominance of whites. But unlike many Republican politicians, he eschewed dog whistles and code words in favor of unvarnished bigotry.Aware of his reach, Republican politicians began competing for his listeners’ votes. That meant firmly solidifying themselves as opponents of women’s rights, privacy and progress.As much as moderate Republicans may have publicly, at least occasionally, wrung their hands over Mr. Limbaugh’s boorishness, they were happy to support his politics.Mr. Limbaugh was so blatantly racist and sexist that he made the race- and gender-based hostilities of mainstream conservatism look more reasonable by comparison. He made hostile misogyny so normal on the reactionary right that Donald Trump, who shocked uninitiated liberals, sounded downright familiar to anyone tuned into right-wing radio.No wonder the attempts in 2016 to kneecap Mr. Trump’s candidacy by pointing to his disparaging comments about women and his boasting about sexual assault were largely impotent. In Rush country, that’s daily entertainment.Mr. Limbaugh didn’t create right-wing misogyny or hate speech. But he did more than his part to reinforce and expand it. In 2017, a man in Mr. Limbaugh’s viciously misogynist mold was installed in the presidency even after calling women pigs and dogs, and even after he was caught on tape boasting about grabbing women’s genitals.https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/20/opinion/rush-limbaugh-women.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces&block=more_in_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=683809517&impression_id=526297f0-73da-11eb-ae9f-596287947b25&index=0&pgtype=Article&region=footer&req_id=835931304&surface=more-in-opinion&variant=1_bandit-all-surfacesAmen.-- Every boy and every galThat’s born into this world aliveIs either a little LiberalOr a little Conservative-- W. S. Gilbert
The author is biased.
It's a woman. Dominatrix. And a Serb.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jill_Filipovic
"Filipovic is of Serbian descent through her father's side of the family. She married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018."
"Filipovic's opposition to name change for women who marry, published in The Guardian in 2013 as "Why should married women change their names? Let men change theirs", was cited as recommended reading on the social construction of gender in Critical Encounters in Secondary English: Teaching Literacy Theory to Adolescents by Deborah Appleman (2014). Filipovic married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018, and kept her last name upon marriage."
Imagine a female Djokovic. That's what you're dealing with here.
She's hot.

--
“We need to acknowledge he let us down. He went down a path he shouldn’t
have, and we shouldn’t have followed him. We shouldn’t have listened to
him, and we can’t let that happen ever again.
The Iceberg
2021-02-22 18:52:53 UTC
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Post by Pelle Svanslös
Post by *skriptis
When the conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died on Wednesday of complications from cancer, he ended a decades-long career as one of the most malignant and sadistic figures on the right.His contributions to contemporary conservatism encouraged members of the Republican Party base to be meaner, smaller and more vulgar. He anchored his banter with a steady stream of invective, by turns promoting xenophobia, racism, homophobia and misogyny, teeing up a ready-made audience for the cruelty politics of Donald Trump.Mr. Limbaugh burst on the national scene in the late 1980s during a national anti-feminist backlash and as the Republican Party was completing its turn away from libertarianism and toward the religious right. While he often gave rhetorical nods to the “pro-family” traditional values of the Moral Majority, he didn’t adopt its veneer of propriety — he was positively lascivious in his rhetoric, using ugliness and shock to promote embittered and unvarnished sexism, and he saw a world of opportunity in the party. Republicans, in turn, saw opportunity in him.He really hit his stride when Bill Clinton ran for office. Mr. Clinton was accompanied by a feminist wife whose biography — a successful lawyer, an advocate for women’s and children’s rights, a woman who kept her own name and identity after marriage — often set off unhinged emotional outbursts from many Republicans, including Mr. Limbaugh.Attacking Hillary Clinton in some of the ugliest terms possible became Mr. Limbaugh’s bread and butter, a guaranteed crowd-pleaser that sustained his show through three decades. He helped build a cottage industry of Hillary-hate.In 1992, Mr. Limbaugh introduced the term “feminazi,” a pejorative he assigned women who spoke out for their own rights generally, and for abortion rights specifically. It was his preferred term, he said, for “women who are obsessed with perpetuating a modern-day Holocaust: abortion.”Girls were not spared his ire. Mr. Limbaugh told viewers of his television show in 1993: “Socks is the White House cat. But did you know there is also a White House dog?” And he held up a photograph of Chelsea Clinton, who at the time was just 13 years old. Two decades later, as he established a steady patter of racist and misogynistic hate aimed at Barack and Michelle Obama, Mr. Limbaugh took to calling Mrs. Obama “Moochelle,” reinforcing the idea that women are only as valuable as their looks — a rule that he did not seem to apply to men.That Mr. Limbaugh’s fortunes grew with this kind of extreme and schlocky rhetoric, could not have been lost on conservative politicians. The victories of the civil rights and feminist movements in the 1960s and ’70s had forced a great reorganization in American politics, with the Republican Party seizing opportunities for growth among whites angry about progress toward racial equality, and among men who resented women’s changing roles and growing power in the workplace, society and the family.Mr. Limbaugh was the ur-character of this new kind of conservative Republican: one who spoke out loudly for traditional values — which in this case meant male authority over women — as well as the cultural, political and economic dominance of whites. But unlike many Republican politicians, he eschewed dog whistles and code words in favor of unvarnished bigotry.Aware of his reach, Republican politicians began competing for his listeners’ votes. That meant firmly solidifying themselves as opponents of women’s rights, privacy and progress.As much as moderate Republicans may have publicly, at least occasionally, wrung their hands over Mr. Limbaugh’s boorishness, they were happy to support his politics.Mr. Limbaugh was so blatantly racist and sexist that he made the race- and gender-based hostilities of mainstream conservatism look more reasonable by comparison. He made hostile misogyny so normal on the reactionary right that Donald Trump, who shocked uninitiated liberals, sounded downright familiar to anyone tuned into right-wing radio.No wonder the attempts in 2016 to kneecap Mr. Trump’s candidacy by pointing to his disparaging comments about women and his boasting about sexual assault were largely impotent. In Rush country, that’s daily entertainment.Mr. Limbaugh didn’t create right-wing misogyny or hate speech. But he did more than his part to reinforce and expand it. In 2017, a man in Mr. Limbaugh’s viciously misogynist mold was installed in the presidency even after calling women pigs and dogs, and even after he was caught on tape boasting about grabbing women’s genitals.https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/20/opinion/rush-limbaugh-women.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces&block=more_in_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=683809517&impression_id=526297f0-73da-11eb-ae9f-596287947b25&index=0&pgtype=Article&region=footer&req_id=835931304&surface=more-in-opinion&variant=1_bandit-all-surfacesAmen.-- Every boy and every galThat’s born into this world aliveIs either a little LiberalOr a little Conservative-- W. S. Gilbert
The author is biased.
It's a woman. Dominatrix. And a Serb.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jill_Filipovic
"Filipovic is of Serbian descent through her father's side of the family. She married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018."
"Filipovic's opposition to name change for women who marry, published in The Guardian in 2013 as "Why should married women change their names? Let men change theirs", was cited as recommended reading on the social construction of gender in Critical Encounters in Secondary English: Teaching Literacy Theory to Adolescents by Deborah Appleman (2014). Filipovic married Ty Lohrer McCormick in 2018, and kept her last name upon marriage."
Imagine a female Djokovic. That's what you're dealing with here.
She's hot.
the New York Times are so pro-women their most famous piece is "For all its flaws Communist China taught women to dream big" LOL
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