Discussion:
(OT) Dead Limbaugh Made America Worse
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Pelle Svanslös
2021-02-23 18:40:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
brimstone. The issue’s cover asked a simple, almost innocent question:
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?

The answer to that question was as obvious 25 years ago as it is today:
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.

Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.

Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.

Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.

His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.

Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.

Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.

What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.

https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse

It's crossing the dot on the i that one of his hoaxes killed him:
cigarette smoke.
--
Every boy and every gal
That’s born into this world alive
Is either a little Liberal
Or a little Conservative

-- W. S. Gilbert
The Iceberg
2021-02-23 18:59:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
Pelle Svanslös
2021-02-23 19:14:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
What's you miffed about now?
--
Every boy and every gal
That’s born into this world alive
Is either a little Liberal
Or a little Conservative

-- W. S. Gilbert
guypers
2021-02-23 19:38:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
What's you miffed about now?
--
Every boy and every gal
That’s born into this world alive
Is either a little Liberal
Or a little Conservative
-- W. S. Gilbert
Fat bastard was a racist homophobic scumbag!
The Iceberg
2021-02-24 13:04:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by guypers
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
What's you miffed about now?
--
Every boy and every gal
That’s born into this world alive
Is either a little Liberal
Or a little Conservative
-- W. S. Gilbert
Fat bastard was a racist homophobic scumbag!
you reckon absolutely anybody who even considered voting Republic once is a racist homophobe don't ya Marxist guppy!
The Iceberg
2021-02-24 13:04:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
What's you miffed about now?
nothing, said it good how you keep exposing your claim to "care".
Pelle Svanslös
2021-02-24 14:09:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Post by The Iceberg
Post by Pelle Svanslös
Twenty-five years ago, Rush Limbaugh graced the cover of Time magazine.
Wearing a striped shirt, an expensive suit, and a look of total
contempt, he held his trademark cigar between two stubby fingers. A
thick plume of smoke obscured part of his face, styling him in
Is Rush Limbaugh good for America?
Limbaugh was not merely bad for the United States, he was bad in
uniquely terrible ways, and uniquely terrible right up until the end. He
is near the top of any list of malign actors in the post-Vietnam period.
Limbaugh’s politics were forged in a crucible of hatred and cruelty;
that his racism and extraordinary misogyny are the only standout
contributions he made to the world.
Limbaugh was undoubtedly influential. But he didn’t ride a “wave of
national polarization,” he was the source of its tidal pull, directing
it with a bullhorn for decades. He first appeared on the airwaves
shortly after the Fairness Doctrine was repealed, helping to introduce a
new style of decidedly unfair media. His politics were vicious and
deceitful, aimed at undercutting liberal institutions in service of
policies that made people like Limbaugh wealthier, often at the expense
of his listeners. He thrived on making people angrier and more
alienated, on obscuring the truth, and rewarding meanness at every turn.
Limbaugh suggested that Jesse Jackson looked like “all composite
pictures of wanted criminals” and compared watching NFL games to
watching the “Bloods and the Crips without weapons.” Obama was a
“halfrican American,” an “affirmative action candidate.” Feminists were
“feminazis”.
His show reveled in punching down, particularly on marginalized
communities, as the purpose of politics itself. Whatever discussion
there is to be had about whether he was the author of this unique style
of grievance politics or merely the man who profited most from it is a
moot point. Limbaugh loosed a dark and ichorous ooze of anger and
resentment into our political groundwater, one that has polluted
American politics and culture.
Limbaugh’s energy had dimmed in recent years. That was, to a certain
extent, a reflection of his fading health; those cigars doing unto his
body what he’d done to our body politic. But it also pointed to the fact
that he was hardly unique anymore: His influence was felt everywhere; a
thousand copycats still prowl the media’s darker corners.
Donald Trump, who awarded Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom
last year, also owes a huge debt to the broadcaster. Trump’s own
seemingly improvised, crass, and mean-spirited speeches weren’t too
distinct from Limbaugh’s own radio show transcripts. Trump’s electorate
was, of course, Limbaugh’s audience—the alienated and aggrieved who
wanted someone to “fight” for them and against everyone who was against
them, the liberals, the experts, the feminists, the nonwhite. Limbaugh,
maybe more than any other figure in recent American political history,
made Trump inevitable.
What Limbaugh proved, in the end, was that American politics and culture
had no red lines. You can be as racist and sexist, as hateful and
divisive as you want—and millions of people will love you for it.
https://newrepublic.com/article/161405/rush-limbaugh-racist-sexist-conservative-media-worse
cigarette smoke.
amazing, you have literally no shame at all! it good you keep exposing yourself like this so much though, you're basically an NPC militant Marxist.
What's you miffed about now?
nothing,
"Apart from ranting, raving and name calling, I'm cool as a cucumber!"
Post by The Iceberg
said it good how you keep exposing your claim to "care".
You're confused again. Caring about one thing doesn't mean I have to
care about dead Limbaugh.
--
“We need to acknowledge he let us down. He went down a path he shouldn’t
have, and we shouldn’t have followed him. We shouldn’t have listened to
him, and we can’t let that happen ever again.”
-- Nikki Haley
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